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Month: February 2016

Fostering Change-Oriented Behaviors

Fostering Change-Oriented Behaviors

Who conducted the study? Cheng-Chen Lin, Department of Business Administration, National Pingtung University of Science & Technology, Taiwan; Yueh-Tzu Kao, Department of Healthcare Administration, I-Shou University, Taiwan; Yuan-Ling Chen, Postgraduate Programs in Management, I-Shou University, Taiwan; and Szu-Chi Lu, Institute of Human Resource Management, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Taiwan What did they find? Terms to know before discussing the results of the study: Employee change-oriented behaviors: Active forms of behavior at work in which employees take charge of situations to…

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The Buffering Effect of Coping Humor on Traumatic Stressors in Firefighters

The Buffering Effect of Coping Humor on Traumatic Stressors in Firefighters

The purpose of this study was to see how traumatic workplace stressors of firefighters impact their cognitive, affective and behavioral outcomes. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), burnout, and absenteeism were the specific outcomes investigated. The researchers sought to determine if humor is an effective coping mechanism. PTSD is a mental health condition triggered by experiencing or seeing a terrifying event and includes cognitive and behavioral outcomes such as the re-experiencing of the trauma, avoidance, and anxiety. Burnout involves a state of…

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Counterproductive Workplace Behaviors, The Five-Factor Model, and the Dark Triad

Counterproductive Workplace Behaviors, The Five-Factor Model, and the Dark Triad

Does normal personality predict counterproductive behavior at work? Or do we need to measure so-called “dark” personality traits to predict such behavior? Who conducted the study? Hilary L. DeShong, DeMond M. Grant, and Stephanie N. Mullins-Sweatt, the authors of this study, are faculty members in the Psychology department Oklahoma State University. Hilary L. DeShong’s research focuses on clinical psychology and personality psychology. DeMond M. Grant has published articles on subjects including anxiety, depression, psychological assessment, and psychopathology. Finally, Stephanie N. Mullins-Sweatt has focused…

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Myth: 70% of Organizational Change Initiatives Fail

Myth: 70% of Organizational Change Initiatives Fail

“70% of organizational change initiatives fail,” or some close variant of the phrase, can be found in the Harvard Business Review, cited by management consulting firms like Gallup and McKinsey, and published in popular press outlets. Oddly, there isn’t any empirical evidence to support this claim. Heather Stagl provides a nice overview of this particular myth and a review article by Mark Hughes of University of Brighton. Reference Hughes, M. (2011). Do 70 per cent of all organizational change initiatives…

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Hope and Optimism in the Face of Change

Hope and Optimism in the Face of Change

Who conducted the study? The authors of this study are Karoline Strauss, an Associate Professor of Organisational Behaviour at ESSEC Business School, Karen Niven, an Associate Professor at Manchester Business School, Charlotte R. McClelland, a Senior Research Associate at Lancaster University, and Bernard K. T. Cheung, Leadership & Talent Consultant. What did they find? This article involved three studies. Study 1 found that hope was a predictor of later task adaptivity and changes within the job function. It was found…

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