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Month: April 2016

Sometimes less is more: Directed coping with interpersonal stressors at work

Sometimes less is more: Directed coping with interpersonal stressors at work

Who conducted the study? Robert R. Wright, from Brigham Young University, Cynthia D. Mohr, from Portland State University, Robert R. Sinclair, from Clemson University and Liu-qin Yang, from Portland State University, conducted this study. What did they find? This study aimed to examine how coping variation is related to effective coping outcomes at work at the person and event levels. The results showed that people who engage in more coping efforts didn’t have effectively coping outcomes because of depleted personal…

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Work Passion: The Driving Force Behind Personal Internalization and Work Outcomes

Work Passion: The Driving Force Behind Personal Internalization and Work Outcomes

    Who conducted the study? Ronald J. Burke, from York University, Marina N. Astakhova, from the University of Texas, and Hongli Hang, from Shanghai International Studies University, conducted this study.   What did they find? The study specifically aimed to examine the link between two types of passion, Harmonious Work Passion and Obsessive Work passion, established in previous research, and there unique link with work outcomes including organization-focused outcomes (job satisfaction, intentions to quit, job performance, and organizational citizenship…

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Looking back and falling further behind: The moderating role of rumination on the relationship between organizational politics and employee attitudes, well-being, and performance

Looking back and falling further behind: The moderating role of rumination on the relationship between organizational politics and employee attitudes, well-being, and performance

Who conducted the study? Christopher C. Rosen, from the University of Arkansas, and Wayne A. Hochwarter, from Florida State University, conducted the study. What did they find?  Three samples demonstrated that politics perceptions negatively affected work outcomes of high ruminators, but demonstrated little influence on those who engage in less rumination. Sample 1 For sample 1, Rosen & Hochwarter (2014) found that politics perceptions were negatively associated with job satisfaction and work effort and positively associated with job tension and…

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Structure is not organization, or, Ce n’est pas une organization

Structure is not organization, or, Ce n’est pas une organization

An iconic management consulting article written more than three decades ago by several legendary Bay Area organization development (or effectiveness) consultants. Still relevant today. “Our assertion is that productive organizational change is not simply a matter of structure, although structure is important. It is not so simple as the interaction between strategy and structure, although strategy is critical too. Our claim is that effective organizational change is really the relationship between structure, strategy, systems, style, skills, staff, and something we…

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Work-Life Balance and Well-Being: The Importance of Individualism and Gender Egalitarianism

Work-Life Balance and Well-Being: The Importance of Individualism and Gender Egalitarianism

Is work-life balance important for well-being, regardless of culture. Recent research suggests that the positive impact of having balanced work and life demands may depend on cultural values. Who conducted the study? An article looking at work-life balance (WLB), a person’s assessment of how well they balance his or her different life roles, was studied by the researchers Jarrod M. Haar, Marcello Russo, Albert Suñe , and Ariane Ollier-Malaterre. They wanted to see how WLB affected individual outcomes including job…

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