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Month: May 2016

Workplace duties or opportunities? Challenge stressors, regulatory focus, and creativity

Workplace duties or opportunities? Challenge stressors, regulatory focus, and creativity

Motivation to achieve gains in the workplace is  beneficial for creativity when faced with challenge stressors. The “Workplace duties or opportunities? Challenge stressors, regulatory focus, and creativity” article examined when workplace demands and their appraisal either impair or lead to creativity.   Terms used… Creativity: generation of of new and useful ideas (Amabile, 1988, 1996). Regulatory focus theory (Higgins, 1997): Looks at the relationship between motivation and the nature one takes to achieve a goal. There are two types: promotion…

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USF Commencement, CHART Lab RA Departures, and Carrying Forth Our Aspirations

USF Commencement, CHART Lab RA Departures, and Carrying Forth Our Aspirations

Excited to see my Undergraduate Management majors and Masters of Organization Development students graduating this afternoon. I’m also proud to see several of my CHART Lab Research Assistants graduating. As a team we will miss their substantive contributions to our research projects, but we’re all excited to see what they accomplish in their post-academic careers. I was honored to provide the Commencement Benediction this year. As a secular scientist who is also a proponent of many of the values associated…

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The Importance of Carrots (not Sticks) for Employee Health Incentives

The Importance of Carrots (not Sticks) for Employee Health Incentives

Healthy incentives in the workplace are of growing concern for companies to promote a healthy work force. The “Incentivizing Wellness in the Workplace: Sticks (Not Carrots) send stigmatizing Signals” article has looked into depth about what way to introduce healthy life styles to employees and the pros of utilizing incentives. Who conducted the study? David Tannenbaum: University of California, Los Angeles Anderson School of Management, Chad J. Valasek: University of California, Los Angeles Department of Sociology, Eric D. Knowles: University…

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Cross-cultural investigation of convergence and divergence of paternalistic leadership

Cross-cultural investigation of convergence and divergence of paternalistic leadership

“Paternalism is a time-worn term that has had indefinite meaning in common usage. (Jackman, 1994: 10)” Who conducted the study? Zeynep Aycan, from Department of Psychology, Koc University, Istanbul, turkey, Birgit Schyns, Durnham University Business School, Urshaw College, Durham, UK, Jian-Min Sun, from Department of Psychology, Renmin University of China, Bejing, People’s Republic of China, Jorg Felfe, from Helmut Schmidt University, Hamburg, Germany, Noreen Saher, from International Islamic University, Islamabad Pakistan. What are the types of leaders? Paternalistic leaders provide…

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Everything we eat both causes and cures cancer, or not.

Everything we eat both causes and cures cancer, or not.

A comical (heartbreaking?) look at the impact of “p-hacking” (e.g., See failure to Replicate), overstated findings (e.g., Dr. Love), and poorly conducted research (e.g., Power Posers). For more resources on identifying illegitimate research, visit Leif, Joseph, and Uri over at Data Colada, keep up on Retraction Watch, and support the Open Science Framework initiative. Note: Video Shared by Mike McDaniel via the HRD Div Listserve today.