Management Communication and Employee Performance: The Contribution of Perceived Organizational Support

Management Communication and Employee Performance: The Contribution of Perceived Organizational Support

This paper aims to examine the temporal relationship between management communication and perceived organizational support, and its consequences for performance.

 

Keyword:

POS (perceived organizational support) – the degree to which employees believe that their organization values their contributions and cares about their well-being and fulfills socioemotional needs.

 

Who conducted the study?

Dr. Robert Eisenberger is a professor in the Psychology Department and Bauer School of Business at the University of Houston. Dr. Eisenberger’s research interests are focused on employee-organization relationship, employee motivation, and creativity.

 

What did the author find?

The study indicates a positive relationship between management communication and POS.

According to the results, management communication at Time 1 was significantly related to POS at Time 2. At Time 2, POS was related to in-role and extra-role performance. However, there were few pieces of evidence to state the relationship between management communication and in/extra role performance.

 

How did they find these results?

Method:

A 3-year time lag (Time 1—2005, Time 2—2008) POS research was conducted by Dr. Eisenberger. The initial sample at Time 1 includes 575 employees and their supervisors, and 41% of them had participated the follow-up section at Time 2.

 

Measures:

Control Variables—organizational tenure at Time 1 (2005); POS—eight high-loading items from the Survey of POS, four positive items and four negative items; Management Communication—four items developed for the research, communication flow was considered as an essential part of organization communication, including both upward and downward communication; In-Role Performance—five items were chosen from Williams and Anderson’s (1999) scale; Extra-Role Performance—the employees’ extra-role performance was estimated by their supervisors, four items were selected from Lynch, Eisenberger, and Armeli (1999), one item developed for this study.

 

Why are these findings important?

The study has made a great contribution to the theoretical knowledge regarding on exploring the relationship between management communication and POS. It acknowledges the key impact to employees’ performance—the organization cares about employees’ the well-being and values of contributions.

 

Where can these results be applied?

The research has serval applications in the empirical world. The study gives organizations and HR managers an idea that open communication is important as other HR practices. Open communication increases POS, and makes employees feel more obligated. Conversely, the lackness of open communication weakens POS, and it may lead disruptive behaviors. A recent article from Forbes —Leadership Lessons From The CEO Of JPMorgan Chase has demonstrated Dr. Eisenberger’s finding. Jamie Dimon who is the Chairman and CEO of JPMorgan Chase highlighted that transparency is the key to the successful leadership. Sharing information is one of the strategies that helps to build a culture of trust. In general, employees perform better when they feel that they are trusted in the team.

 

 

Eisenberger. R. (2012). Management Communication and Employee Performance: The Contribution of Perceived Organizational Support. Human Performance, 25, 452-464. doi: 10.1080/08959285.2012.721834

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