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Tag: Employee Well-Being

Financial Success and (or?) Happiness

Financial Success and (or?) Happiness

Thanks to Jill Suttie for her article at Greater Good Magazine on the relationship between money and happiness. She cites Lora Park and my own research. Monnot hopes his research might help individuals—and business leaders and policymakers—to realize that fulfilling psychological needs is more important to happiness than making a lot of money. “Autonomy, developing a skill set to be good at what you do, being affiliative with others, having a sense of connection to your community—these are all things…

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Examining Easterlin’s Paradox in Post-Reform China

Examining Easterlin’s Paradox in Post-Reform China

Had a great time writing this piece for The International Academic Forum‘s interdisciplinary academic platform, Think, designed for both the academic community and general readership. How far is money related to levels of satisfaction with life? Dr Matthew J. Monnot of the University of San Francisco, United States, discusses the contrast between decades of GDP growth in China and stagnant levels of individual life and job satisfaction, questioning whether monetary incentives can fill evolved psychological needs and examining the relationship…

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Management Communication and Employee Performance: The Contribution of Perceived Organizational Support

Management Communication and Employee Performance: The Contribution of Perceived Organizational Support

This paper aims to examine the temporal relationship between management communication and perceived organizational support, and its consequences for performance.   Keyword: POS (perceived organizational support) – the degree to which employees believe that their organization values their contributions and cares about their well-being and fulfills socioemotional needs.   Who conducted the study? Dr. Robert Eisenberger is a professor in the Psychology Department and Bauer School of Business at the University of Houston. Dr. Eisenberger’s research interests are focused on…

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Occupational Organization Health Intervention to Improve Knowledge Workers Well Being

Occupational Organization Health Intervention to Improve Knowledge Workers Well Being

A large percentage of the workforce are employed in ‘knowledge’ jobs, cognitively demanding jobs such as IT engineers, academics, and accountants. These jobs are known to be stressful for the workers, however, job redesign is challenging. Over 14 months, a participative organizational-level health intervention was evaluated across six organizations in Denmark. The intervention was designed to improve working conditions and psychological well-being of knowledge workers. Who conducted the study? Ole Henning Sørensen of the Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark at the…

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Organizational-level Interventions: Employee Perceptions and Psychosocial Outcomes

Organizational-level Interventions: Employee Perceptions and Psychosocial Outcomes

Organizational-level occupational health interventions are a very popular method to adapt changes in the workplace. However, there are conflicting impacts of this kind of change. This study takes place over two years (2005 and 2007) to assess the association of employee perceptions of exposure to interventions and the psychosocial outcomes. Who conducted the study? Henna Hasson of Karolinska Institutet Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Medical Management Centre (Sweden); URESP, Centre de recherche FRSQ du Centre hospitalier affilié universitaire…

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Impacts of Different Employee Relationships on Employee Well-Being

Impacts of Different Employee Relationships on Employee Well-Being

This study looked to see if employee relationship quality (ERQ) influences employee well-being (EWB) and how it does if so. Who conducted the study?  Hong Chen, Jia Wei, Ke Wang, and Yi Peng
 of the School of Management, CUMT, Xuzhou, China What did they find?  The quality of employee-superior, -subordinate, -coworker, -family, and –friend relationships can be evaluated by the stability, support, and trust in the relationship. The quality of employee-organization relationships can be evaluated by organizational support, supportive behavior…

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