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Tag: Organizational Behavior

Attachment Issues: Leader-Subordinate Relationships After Voluntary Departures

Attachment Issues: Leader-Subordinate Relationships After Voluntary Departures

Who conducted the study? The study was conducted by Debra L. Shapiro of The University of Maryland, Peter Hom of Arizona State University, Wei Shen of Arizona State University, and Rajshreee Agarwal of The University of Maryland. What was the aim of the study? Researchers in this particular field of study has identified that when a leader in the workplace leaves the organization, subordinates have a tendency to increase their likelihood of leaving the company they are working for, known…

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Flourishing Via Workplace Relationships: Moving Beyond Instrumental Support

Flourishing Via Workplace Relationships: Moving Beyond Instrumental Support

The study of meaning, positive experiences, and life satisfaction, are increasingly gaining attention in organizational literature all around the world. With the wave of millennials now entering the workplace, there are changing expectations and growing appetites to find meaning at work. A new generation in business and a new generation for business is emerging. Today, the value of flourishing in the workplace is a critical element to be considered for business strategy, from talent acquisition and employee retention to organizational…

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Relational Energy: Energizing the Workforce

Relational Energy: Energizing the Workforce

Who conducted the study? The study was conducted by Bradley P Owens of Brigham Young University, Wayne E. Baker of the University of Michigan, Dana McDaniel Sumpter of California State University, Long beach, and Kim S. Cameron of the University of Michigan. What was the aim of the study? In the industrial and organizational field, the idea of energy at the workplace is one of great importance to organizations and other workplaces wherein human involvement is needed for the company…

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Relaxing Moral Reasoning to Win: How Organizational Identification Relates to Unethical Pro-Organizational Behavior

Relaxing Moral Reasoning to Win: How Organizational Identification Relates to Unethical Pro-Organizational Behavior

Who conducted the study? Mo Chen from Shanghai Jiao Tong University, and Chao C. Chen and Oliver J. Sheldon from Rutgers University, conducted the study. What did they find? Three hypotheses were tested: Hypothesis 1: Organizational identification is positively related to Unethical Pro-organizational Behavior (UPB). Hypothesis 2: Moral disengagement mediates the positive relationship between organizational identification and UPB. Hypothesis 3: The indirect positive relationship between organizational identification and UPB through moral disengagement is stronger when interorganization competition is more intense….

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Looking back and falling further behind: The moderating role of rumination on the relationship between organizational politics and employee attitudes, well-being, and performance

Looking back and falling further behind: The moderating role of rumination on the relationship between organizational politics and employee attitudes, well-being, and performance

Who conducted the study? Christopher C. Rosen, from the University of Arkansas, and Wayne A. Hochwarter, from Florida State University, conducted the study. What did they find?  Three samples demonstrated that politics perceptions negatively affected work outcomes of high ruminators, but demonstrated little influence on those who engage in less rumination. Sample 1 For sample 1, Rosen & Hochwarter (2014) found that politics perceptions were negatively associated with job satisfaction and work effort and positively associated with job tension and…

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