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Tag: Well-Being

Financial Success and (or?) Happiness

Financial Success and (or?) Happiness

Thanks to Jill Suttie for her article at Greater Good Magazine on the relationship between money and happiness. She cites Lora Park and my own research. Monnot hopes his research might help individuals—and business leaders and policymakers—to realize that fulfilling psychological needs is more important to happiness than making a lot of money. “Autonomy, developing a skill set to be good at what you do, being affiliative with others, having a sense of connection to your community—these are all things…

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Examining Easterlin’s Paradox in Post-Reform China

Examining Easterlin’s Paradox in Post-Reform China

Had a great time writing this piece for The International Academic Forum‘s interdisciplinary academic platform, Think, designed for both the academic community and general readership. How far is money related to levels of satisfaction with life? Dr Matthew J. Monnot of the University of San Francisco, United States, discusses the contrast between decades of GDP growth in China and stagnant levels of individual life and job satisfaction, questioning whether monetary incentives can fill evolved psychological needs and examining the relationship…

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Hypocrisy in The Workplace: Undermined Victims Become Perpetrators

Hypocrisy in The Workplace: Undermined Victims Become Perpetrators

Who conducted the study? This study was conducted by KiYoung Lee of The University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Eugene Kim of the Georgia Institute of Technology, Devasheesh P. Bhave of Singapore Management University and Michelle K. Duffy of The University of Minnesota.   What was the aim of the study? Undermining, in the field of industrial and organizational psychology, is wherein a person exhibits behavior towards another person that is intended to stop them from achieving…

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Relational Energy: Energizing the Workforce

Relational Energy: Energizing the Workforce

Who conducted the study? The study was conducted by Bradley P Owens of Brigham Young University, Wayne E. Baker of the University of Michigan, Dana McDaniel Sumpter of California State University, Long beach, and Kim S. Cameron of the University of Michigan. What was the aim of the study? In the industrial and organizational field, the idea of energy at the workplace is one of great importance to organizations and other workplaces wherein human involvement is needed for the company…

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Looking back and falling further behind: The moderating role of rumination on the relationship between organizational politics and employee attitudes, well-being, and performance

Looking back and falling further behind: The moderating role of rumination on the relationship between organizational politics and employee attitudes, well-being, and performance

Who conducted the study? Christopher C. Rosen, from the University of Arkansas, and Wayne A. Hochwarter, from Florida State University, conducted the study. What did they find?  Three samples demonstrated that politics perceptions negatively affected work outcomes of high ruminators, but demonstrated little influence on those who engage in less rumination. Sample 1 For sample 1, Rosen & Hochwarter (2014) found that politics perceptions were negatively associated with job satisfaction and work effort and positively associated with job tension and…

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Work-Life Balance and Well-Being: The Importance of Individualism and Gender Egalitarianism

Work-Life Balance and Well-Being: The Importance of Individualism and Gender Egalitarianism

Is work-life balance important for well-being, regardless of culture. Recent research suggests that the positive impact of having balanced work and life demands may depend on cultural values. Who conducted the study? An article looking at work-life balance (WLB), a person’s assessment of how well they balance his or her different life roles, was studied by the researchers Jarrod M. Haar, Marcello Russo, Albert Suñe , and Ariane Ollier-Malaterre. They wanted to see how WLB affected individual outcomes including job…

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